Making your web pages search friendly

Making your web pages search friendly

Get started in search engine optimisation by improving the pages on your website. This video explains the elements that you can tweak to make your website easier for search engines to understand. We’ll cover:

  • title and description meta tags
  • heading elements
  • page copy.

Do a search for one of the products or services you offer. Take a look at the results with a close eye on how other businesses optimise title tags and meta descriptions.

View Transcript

Hello!

In this video we’ll talk about the simple things you can do to optimise the pages of your website so search engines can find you more easily. Because if they can, so can potential customers. On-page optimisation, or changes you can make on your website’s individual pages, can quickly help search engines better understand your content. Let’s say you run a small farm called Blake Produce and are looking to optimise a page about your fruits and vegetables selection.

There are several elements on your page that can tell the search engine that the page is about fresh fruits and vegetables. These include: meta tags and title, headings and the page copy itself. Let’s start with meta tags and title. These aren’t something you would see on a web page unless you were looking at its code. They’re embedded messages that help the search engine determine what’s on the page. In particular, there’s the title and the meta description.

The title and meta description are important because they both are used by the search engine to generate the actual search result for the specific page. The title is used to generate the first line shown; the meta description is used to generate the few short sentences that follow.

For a page about fruits and vegetables, you’ll want to make sure that the phrase “fruits and vegetables” is in both the title and meta description. A good title would be: “Blake Produce – Fresh Fruits and Vegetables.” This describes what the page is about and also highlights your company name.

A good meta description is usually two short sentences. It should also reinforce the title by using the keyword or phrase again. A good description would be: “Blake’s Produce delivers organic fresh fruit & veg to your home, as often as you need it. Order your customisable box online.

A title should be short and sweet; a description should match what the page is about. You should also consider what’s on the page itself—what people who visit your site – not just search engines – actually see. There are two things you can optimise here to help search engines categorise your content correctly: headings and page copy.

Like meta tags, headings are embedded in the HTML code of your page, but they’re also visible to people. Often, they’re displayed at the top of a page. A great heading would be “fresh fruits and vegetables,” which clearly tells a person what the page is about but works well for the search engines, too.

Finally, if you’re writing a piece of content about fresh fruits and vegetables, you’ll naturally want to use that phrase in the copy. Don’t go overboard and repeat the phrase over and over because search engines may see that as spam. Remember that you’re writing primarily for people, so be sure your message is clear. So, let’s recap what you’ve done to optimise the farm’s web pages. You’ve looked at each of the major elements used by search engines and, in each instance, told them, “This page is about fresh fruits and vegetables.”

No matter where search engines look, they’ll see consistent and clear information about what’s on the page. And that might help improve your search engine rankings.


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